2009 Women in Film Festival Recap

The 4th annual WIFF is over… the curtains are drawn… and Vancouver sits in a thin blanket of snow. It’s a great day to rest and recuperate. I know I’m totally biased… but I think the WIFF is one of the best film festivals around. It’s not just the great films, it’s the networking/socializing, community-building, commraderie. That and just plain nice people attend the festival. The venue is great for hanging out in between screenings. Some highlights (too many to mention!): I mentioned The Baby Formula in my last post, which was quite fun. I also enjoyed Carl Bessai’s Mothers and Daughters. In it, six of Canada’s top actresses improvised their lines using only skeletons of stories to portray the interwoven...

Day Two Women in Film Festival

I had the romantic notion that I would live-blog some of the events at the Fourth Annual Women In Film Festival, but I’ve been too busy! Yesterday was the festival’s first New Media Day and I was one of the principle organizers. (Here’s a tip if you’re ever organizing an event… don’t put yourself as the moderator on the first panel of the morning! Leave that to someone with a fresh brain.) The Media Day included four panel discussions, an interactive exhibit, application demos, and a networking party with free beer from Molsens. Yay free beer! We had a social media team who actually DID live blog and tweet the event, so if you want to hear more… check out these links from: miss604 hummingbird604 – twitter feed on...

And Speaking of No Woman Ever Winning an Academy Award for Best Director…

In my last post I mentioned that no woman has ever won an Oscar for best director and only 3 have ever been nominated. There is now a campaign to get Slumdog Millionnaire’s co-director Loveleen Tandan on the academy nomination with director Danny Boyle. Jan Lisa Huttner of WITASWAN has kicked up the campaign. Tandan is being very gracious about the whole thing, of course. There’s no way she’s going to make a stink about it. She has been getting lots of press in India. But internationally, no one was mentioning it. I’m all for Tandan sharing the nomination, especially if she was as indispendible as Boyle says. I am vocal about the inequalities in the film industry… but if she gets it, will people take it seriously or will it be known...

Where are the Women directors?

A few years ago I participated in the launch of a campaign called Please Adjust Your Set. It was a study of the labour issues surrounding women in the BC film and television industry. This type of initiative has been repeated in other cities with similar results. The studies all demonstrate what was “previously understood only anecdotally; women are underrepresented and under-remunerated in many occupations and facets of the industry.” As the results of our “record and report” strategy came in, it inspired a lot of discussion around why this is the case. When almost half of film school students are female, how come they are so glaringly underrepresented? In what stage does the drop off happen? There are a lot of theories, from self-esteem...